The coolest hidden show of the hour

You surely have friends who still boast of having seen Nirvana at Les Foufounes Electriques in 1991 and on Thursday, they drank natural wines before Marc Séguin designed the chic labels for the bottles of Pinard & Filles, frankly.

Release September 28

Yes, I’m talking about those people, often snobbish and haughty, who exhibit this universal gift of making us feel completely overwhelmed and useless.

These people are definitely watching the bear on Disney+, the coolest – and least known – series of the last few months. No, wait. These people are hoodwinking the bear. And these people don’t understand that we can look at anything other than the bear right now, let’s see.

Critics are very much in agreement with these folks. They love to the bear. Even the restaurant industry, depicted harshly and chaotic in this American television series, incense the bear.

Confession, here: I copiously hated the first episode of the bear, as well as the second, which immerse us in the muddy kitchen of a messy restaurant in Chicago. It is not respectable.

It screams, it’s damned, it gets pissed off, it always cuts off speech, it’s anxiety-provoking, it’s raw, the nervous camera shakes like at MusiquePlus in 2002, the ubiquitous music attacks us non-stop, it’s It’s so stressful that it needs two Ativans (stat!) to keep our hearts from kicking our chests. In short, no pleasure to watch it.

think about the movie whiplashmore transposed into a family boui-boui that works off the hook and where periods of heavy traffic turn into an oily and toxic ballet, which always culminates in injuries or accidents.





That’s it, the bear : a hyper-realistic foray behind the scenes of a restaurant populated by employees with shitty characters. I persevered and made it to the eighth and final episode, I was one of those people who sing the praises of the bear loudly. I’m even surprised to googling recipes for brageole and spaghetti pomodoro, possessed by the autumnal spirit of Josée di Stasio. Discloser: I’m never going to cook all that, let’s understand each other.

And why does this cacophonous and frantic series of eight half-hours captivate us so much? Because it makes us feel things. Urgency, tension, conflict, despair, anger, violence and grief.

In the salons, you can almost smell the sweat of badly yelled characters, the smoke of cigarettes smoked in the alley and the meat fat clinging to clothing. We are there, with them, during the gunshots.

the bear revolves around the taciturn Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto (Jeremy Allen White), a young chef from Chicago trained at the greatest tables in the world. When her drug-addicted older brother commits suicide, Carmy hears about his son “greasy spoon”, who serves Italian beef sandwiches to a clientele of bus drivers and blue-collar workers.

Disgusted with Michelin-starred pitches, the dark Carmy is working to enhance the gastronomic bar and hires a talented sous-chef to implement a French brigade method. Obviously, the old employees of the snack bar revolt and the chicane takes over the pans, fed for the rage of cousin Richie, a real asshole who yells all the time.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY FX NETWORKS

Ebon Moss-Bacherch and Ayo Edebiri in the bear

the bear whether it’s between tradition, gentrification and modernity: should we seduce the neighborhood sores with fragrant risotto or focus on the faithful who have frequented the place for ages? The seventh episode is an endless 17-minute dive into kitchen hell, fasten your aprons, the heat remains at Grill long time.

The more the heart of the series beats under the white t-shirt of Carmy, a complex and deficient antihero. Why does Carmy struggle so much to save this – very ordinary – remnant from bankruptcy? He could close it, shave it, or just sell it. Quickly, we understand that it is himself that Carmy is trying to save himself in this psychological-culinary adventure.

By keeping the snack bar open, it is the memory of his dead brother, and that of his once united family, that he preserves. Play a song from Radiohead, Wilco or Sufjan Stevens here.

Pastaga restaurant co-owner Martin Juneau gobbled up all eight episodes of the bear, even though he swallowed the first two askew. “It was too aggressive, I really had misery. It was such a mess. But you end up boarding, because the show sort of follows the organization of the kitchen. The more you advance in the episodes, the more the spirits are calm and things are placed. Even the kitchen looks cleaner in the end,” he explains.

According to Martin Juneau, the bear vividly depicts the most catastrophic evenings in a restaurant. “The kitchen is a controlled mess, and it’s always a bit of chaos,” he slips.

For now, the French soundtrack does not come with the bear, Only subtitles work on Disney+. And what does the famous bear in the title of the series refer to? This is Carmy’s nickname, plus also a punch that comes out in the final episode. A second service of the bear summer ordered for next year. It looks both delicious and scary. prepare the Tums and the Xanax.

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